List of Resources

Recommended Reading List for Literature and a Resource for Learning About Korean Art

Chung Hyo Ye: Tales of filial devotion, loyalty, respect and benevolence from the history and folklore of Korea
By: Korean Spirit and Culture Promotion Project. n.d.
Seoul: Diamond Sutra Recitation Group

The booklet contains some of Korea’s most famous folk tales and conveys many of the important values in the process. The entire booklet is available by accessing the following website: http://www.kscpp.net
A Single Square Picture: A Korean Adoptee’s Search for Her Roots
By: Robinson, Katy
This book “is a personal odyssey that ascends to the universal, a story that will resonate with anyone who has ever questioned their place in the world – and had the courage to find the answers.”
A Step from Heaven
By: Na, An
Penguin Group

This book is described in a New York Times review as a book “endowed with a haunting grace, by the exquisite voice of a new young writer. An Na chronicles the challenges faced by a Korean immigrant family. The journey An Na chronicles in Young Ju Park’s graceful and resonant voice is an acculturation process that is at times wrenching, at times triumphant and consistently absorbing.” Grades 8-12. It is also a highly recommended book for Language Arts teachers and school counselors.
A Yang for Every Yin: Dramatizations of Korean Classics
By: Holstein, John
The collection includes five famous Korean plays: “Harelip,” “The Song Bag,” “The Gourds Reward,” “The Money Bug,” and Chunhyang. Musical scores for each play are also available. The book can be purchased from Seoul Selection Books (http://www.seoulselection.com) The plays are suitable for grades 4-12.
Bee-bim Bop!
By: Park, Linda Sue
2005

This is a delightful storybook that will engage all children, but particularly well suited for K-3. It includes “playful verse with a bouncy beat,” charming illustrations, humor and a recipe for a very popular Korean dish.
Dear Juno
By: Pak, Soyung
“When Juno’s parents are too busy to read him a letter from his grandmother in Korea, he decides to open the letter himself. He cannot read the Korean words, but there is more in the envelope than just the letter. Grandmother has sent along a few things – a dried flower and a photograph of herself with her cat. These little things tell Juno a lot: Grandmother has a new cat and she is planting a flower garden. Now Juno wants to write back – without help from mom and dad – but Grandmother cannot read English. Juno knows just what to do.” Grades K-3
Echoes of the White Giraffe
By: Ook Nyul Choi
Sookan, the unforgettable heroine of “The Year of Impossible Goodbyes,” is now fifteen years old and a refugee in Pusan, a city in a southern province of Korea. The Korean War is raging, and she once again has been separated from her father and brothers. Anxiously awaiting any news of them, Sookan imagines a time when she can return to a normal life in Seoul. In the meantime, though she often feels sad, alone, and scared, she finds solace in a forbidden friendship with the mysterious “shouting poet” who offers her and her fellow refugees inspiration each morning. The book gives the reader a revealing look at the role of women in Korean society and provides the reader with an engrossing and romantic story of an exceptional young woman’s coming of age. It is also a captivating story about perseverance and the value of education for young people.
Firekeeper’s Son
By: Park, Linda Sue
In Korea in the early 1800s, news from the countryside reached the king by means of signal fires. On one mountaintop after another, a fire was lit when all was well. If the king did not see a fire, this meant trouble, and he would send out his army. Linda Sue Park’s first picture book for Clarion is about Sang-hee, son of the village firekeeper. When his father is unable to light the fire one night, young Sang-hee must take his place. Sang-hee knows how important it is for the fire to be lit-but he wishes that he could see soldiers . . . just once. Grades K-4
Learning from Asian Art: Korea
An exceptional teaching resource. Educators who know little about Korea can be confident in adopting the lessons with minimal preparation time. Teachers of all levels will be able to adapt these materials for their specific needs. Beautiful photographs and slides inspire assignments and research in art, history and language arts classes. The kit contains a resource book, a sizable map of Korea, a helpful comparative time line, twenty photographs, ten image cards and sixteen slides that include images of clay roof tiles, Buddhist sculpture, ceramics, folk art, furniture and screens from the 7th century to the work of a contemporary Korean artist. The resource book provides accurate and clear historical information, group activities and research ideas related to every art object. Creative projects, such as making 3-D dragons, clay tiles, scroll paintings and treasure boxes, are included with every photograph. The book also includes “looking questions,” a helpful glossary, a bibliography and Internet sites that provide more images of Korean art located in Asian and American museums.
This outstanding resource is available from the Philadelphia Art Museum’s museum shop at http://www.philamuseum.org. for $39.95.
Good Fortune in a Wrapping Cloth
2006
This lesson book is an outstanding newly published resource for high school world history, geography and Asian studies classes. Maps, timelines, and descriptions of the Silk Road rarely show Korea’s integral involvement in Silk Road trade or the transmission of Silk Road ideas and goods from Korea to Japan. The overall purpose of this carefully researched lesson book is to expand the view of the Silk Road and of international trade found in most world history textbook and classes. Silla shows an Eastern instead of a Western view of Silk Road trade and deals with a time period that produced one of the world’s “Golden Ages.” The lesson also provides material for a debate on whether or not Silla benefited from the international connections along the Silk Road. Students may come to understand that some of the issues of globalization that we face today were also present for past cultures as well. This is available for $20 from The Korea Society on this page.
I am the Clay
By: SPICE/Stanford
This curriculum unit introduces students to the four core pillars of the U.S.-South Korean alliance: democracy, economic prosperity, security, and socio-cultural interaction. Through their study of these pillars, students develop an understanding of the nature and history of this longstanding relationship. Softcover. $44.95. It includes a CD-ROM of images and PowerPoint presentation. Very suitable for U.S. history, Asian Studies, Economics, and Government classes.
In the Absence of Sun
By: SPICE/Stanford
This is a complete unit of study for secondary and community college students. “North Korea remains one of the most misunderstood and misrepresented countries in the United States. “Uncovering North Korea” seeks to fill this gap and strives to bring more accurate information and objectivity to the study of North Korea. Softcover $69.95. Includes a CD-ROM; DVD “A State of Mind.” See SPICE.Stanford.edu/catalogue
Korean Cinderella
By: SPICE/Stanford
This curriculum unit introduces students to the four core pillars of the U.S.-South Korean alliance: democracy, economic prosperity, security, and socio-cultural interaction. Through their study of these pillars, students develop an understanding of the nature and history of this longstanding relationship. Softcover. $44.95. It includes a CD-ROM of images and PowerPoint presentation. Very suitable for U.S. history, Asian Studies, Economics, and Government classes.
Lost Names: Scenes from a Korean Childhood
By: Kim, Richard
Accessible for junior high students, Lost Names, is an outstanding literary selection for high school students. Kim recounts his own childhood and the suffering and insults inflicted on his village during Japanese occupation of Korea. The writing is simple, but poetic. The story is very touching and one of the most well written and memorable books I have read in the past ten years. (High school and possibly middle school)
Modern Korean Fiction: An Anthology
By: Fulton, Bruce and Youngmin Kwon
Columbia University Press (2005)

“In terms of its range and consistent quality, there is simply no other comparable collection. A combination of fresh, new translations of old classics and a judicious selection of more recent writing makes this long-awaited anthology a most welcome publication for anyone interested in twentieth century Korea.” Janet Poole, New York University. Recommended for a senior English class and college level students.
Our Twisted Hero
By: Munyol, Yi
Yi Munyol’s short novel (128 pages) is a relevant and powerful story with a powerful message. Set in Korea during the 1960s, the book specifically references the April 19Student Revolution of 1960 when students were protesting the corrupt election of Syngman Rhee. The story itself has been compared to The Lord of the Flies with good reason, but is not as overtly violent. The story involves a 12 year old narrator, Han Pyongtae, who arrives at his new school in rural Korea. Fresh from big city schools in Seoul, he expects to earn the highest marks and the respect of his peers. Instead, he encounters a classroom bully in the form of Om Sokdae who extorts food, candy, and prized possessions from the other children and holds his classmates in terror. Worse, the teacher will not intervene. Our Twisted Hero is the story of how Han Pyongtae copes with this situation. American readers will be fascinated by this glimpse inside Korean society and the Korean school system. But this is not just a Korean story as Han Pyongtae’s story seems universal. His struggle is not only with the bully, but with the perceptions of the other children, feelings of injustice, and the confidence of his parents. Highly recommended for middle and high school students.
This edition is in both English and Korean and is available for approximately $12.00 in paperback through Seoul Selection Books. http://seoulselection.com.
Poems for Planting Love: A Collection of Poems and Artwork by Children with Disabilities.
Written by the students of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill and translated by Brother Anthony of Taize. The book includes memorable poetry and illustrations. Available through Seoul Selection. http://www.seoulselection.com
Project Mulberry
By: Park, Linda Sue
Yearling Publishers

This is a highly engaging and worthwhile book for young readers. It is a story of a Korean American fourth grader who becomes involved in a challenging project to win a blue ribbon at the state fair. Grades 4-7.
Seesaw Girl
By: Park, Linda Sue
Impatient with the constraints on her as an aristocratic girl living in the 17th century (Choson Dynasty), 12-year old Jade Blossom determines to see beyond her small world. “Jade Blossom can never go beyond her family’s inner court. All girls from good Korean families must learn to sew, do laundry, and work in the kitchen. This prepares them for their future lives in their husbands’ inner court. Jade has other interests. She longs to take trips to the mountains and the marketplace. If only she could read and paint, but these are things only boys can do. Jade won’t stop thinking about the world beyond the high walls of her home. Then one day she secretly sets off to do what no other girl her age has ever done before. The story is a charming story that is full of lively action and vivid descriptions, enhanced by appealing black-and-white paintings to give a clear sense of the period.”
Still Life with Rice
By: Lee, Helie
The captivating story of the author’s discovery of her own identity and the inspiring story of her Korean grandmother’s life during Japanese occupation and the Korean War years. See review on Social Studies School Service website mentioned above. High School.
The East Asian Story Finder: A Guide to 468 Tales from China, Japan, and Korea, Listing Subjects and Sources
By: Sharon Barcan Elswit
Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co. (2009)

Summaries of wonderful tales from cultural and ethnic groups from throughout East Asia.
The Kite Fighters
By: Park, Linda Sue.
A story of two brothers during the Choson Dynasty who enter the New Year kite competition. The story includes an exciting account of what happens when the brothers get to know the young king, participate in the kite competition, and includes a considerable amount of information about Korean culture in pre-modern Korean history. Grades 4-6th.
Information for teaching The Kite Fighters is at http://voicethread.com/share/631151/. Information, images, and questions for students on themes, characters, and background of Linda Sue Park’s book for 4th-6th grade readers.
The Legend of Hong Kil Dong: The Robin Hood of Korea
By: Anne Sibley O’Brien
“Like the Western world’s Robin Hood, the legendary Hong Kil Dong of 15th century Korea stood as a champion of the poor. Gaining knowledge and power denied to him by class, Hong Kil Dong led an army of peasants against corruption and injustice. The book is beautifully illustrated and presented in cartoon form. Suitable for ages 9 and up.
The Year of Impossible Goodbyes
By: Choi, Sook Nyul
Choi provides the reader with a very moving account of the experiences of individuals during Japanese occupation, their high hopes upon liberation in 1945, their fears as Russian troops took control of North Korea and their dangerous escape to American-controlled South Korea. “Here is the incredible story of one family’s love for each other and their determination to risk everything to find freedom.” Suitable from grades 6-12.
Waxen Wings: The ACTA Koreana Anthology of Short Fiction from Korea
By: Fulton, Bruce
Waxen Wings includes nine short stories that introduce Americans to Korean culture. They are beautifully translated and are without exception the most comprehensive, memorable, and enjoyable Korean stories that I have read. They are also the most accessible selection of stories for Western readers to date. My favorite stories are “Prison of the Heart” (focuses on Post-War Korea), “Waxen Wings” (a memorable fable), “We Teach Shame” (contemporary story with flashbacks to the Korean War), “The Pager (an entertaining contemporary story), and “The Glass Shield” (highly creative and amusing). (high school and college).
When My Name was Keoko
By: Park, Linda Sue
2002

Inspired by her own family’s stories of living in South Korea during the Japanese occupation, Newbery Medal-winning author Linda Sue Park chronicles the compelling story of two siblings, 10 year old Sunhee and 13 year old Taeyul and their battle to maintain their identity and dignity during one of Korea’s most difficult and turbulent times. Her account is carefully researched and will be captivating for children between 5th and 9th grades.
Yello-Oh Girls: Emerging Voices Explore Culture, Identity and Growing Up Asian American
By: Vickie. Editor
NamQuill Publishers, an imprint of Harper Collins publishers, 2001

Yello-Oh Girls: Emerging Voices Explore Culture, Identity and Growing Up Asian American.Nam, Vickie. Editor. Quill Publishers (an imprint of Harper Collins publishers, 2001. An excellent collection of short essays written by Asian American girls. $13.00. Suitable for junior and senior high school students.

Recommended Reading List for History

A New History of Korea A New History of Korea
By: Lee, Ki-Baik
1984

This is considered one of the most comprehensive, widely read, and respected Korean Studies texts written by one of Korea’s top scholars. It is notable for the inclusion of cultural development “not merely as isolated expressions of the creative spirit of the Korean people, but as an integral component of the overall Korean historical experience.” Although some of Ki-Baik Lee’s interpretations of history remain controversial, his book has enjoyed unparalleled acceptance by academics and the educated public.
Korea in World History
By: Clark, Don
2012
This is outstanding introductory account of Korean history in a global context. The chapters are concise, informative, and engaging. Clark’s account demonstrates the relevancy of Korean history for American readers
North Korea through the Looking Glass
By: Oh, Kongdan and Ralph C. Hassig
2000

Sixty years after its founding at the beginning of the Cold War, North Korea remains one of the world’s most isolated and enigmatic nations, dominated by the official ideology of Juche, which emphasizes national self-reliance, independence, and worship of the supreme leader, Kim Jong Il. Oh and Hassig explore North Korea’s stubborn adherence to policies that have failed to serve the welfare of some twenty million people. The book explains in fascinating detail how North Korea has survived the fall of the global socialist system and the significant challenges surrounding reunification.
A Concise History of Korea: From the Neolithic Period through the Nineteenth Century
By: Seth, Michael J.
2006

Michael J. Seth, an associate professor of history at James Madison University, has written an engaging and concise history of pre-modern Korea. Seniors in high school and undergraduate students will find this book to be particularly interesting as it equally emphasizes social, cultural and political history. While focusing on Korea, he emphasizes how Korean history can be understood as part of an interactive sphere that includes China, Japan and the Manchurian/Central Asia region. He does not burden his readers with facts, but after providing detailed political developments, he inevitably steps back and explains what the details signify. This is one of the latest and most valuable new resources for teachers of Asian Studies.
Bipolar Orders: The Two Koreas since 1989
By: Lynn, Hyung Gu
2007, Black Point, Nova Scotia: Fernwood Publishing

Carter Eckert, Professor of Korean History (Harvard University) states that “among the plethora of recent books on Korea, this is one that truly stands out” as an essential book to read for anyone interested in contemporary Korea. While the author states that he is not against reunification, he examines whether it is a “necessary or inevitable process.”
East Asia Before the West: Five Centuries of Trade and Tribute
By: David C. Kang
“David Kang’s book is well written and rich in details that provide a deeper understanding of the traditions and practices that were the basis of East Asian stability for centuries before the arrival of Western merchants and missionaries. While explaining the complex interactions of the political entities of the 14th through the 19th centuries, Kang also points out why an understanding of the period is necessary to understand what the future holds for modern successors of Asian countries.” Thomas P. Dolan in Education About Asia
Ethnic Peace in the American City: Building Community in Los Angeles and Beyond
By: Chang, Edward and Jennette Diaz-Veizades
1999
This book “documents the nature of contemporary interethnic relations in the United States by describing the dynamics of race in inner-city Los Angeles… The authors explore practical means by which ethnically fragmented neighborhoods can work together to begin to address their common concerns before tensions become explosive.” Paperback.
Fifty Wonders of Korea. Vol.1. Culture and Art
By: Korean Spirit & Culture Promotion Project
2007, Seoul: Diamond Sutra Recitation Group

In addition to a section on printing, language, and history, the second part of this well-written book describes some of the great treasures of Korean art, architecture, ceramics, and sculpture. The booklet contains many beautiful illustrations. The complete book may be found at this website: http://www.kscpp.net
Hamel’s Journal and a description of the Kingdom of Korea (1653-1666)
By: Hamel, Hendrik
1994, Seoul: Royal Asiatic Society

Hamel’s fascinating account is the earliest report in a western language about Korea, its people and their customs
King Sejong the Great: The Everlasting Light of Korea. Korean Spirit and Culture Series II
By: Diamond Sutra Recitation Group. n.d.
The booklet is an engaging and well-written account of King Sejong’s achievements, especially the coverage on the invention of han’gul. This entire book may found on http://www.kscpp.net
Korea and Her Neighbors
By: Bird, Isabella Lucy
2004, Boston: Adamant Media Corporation
The author was a famous traveler and writer in the late nineteenth century and visited Korea four times between 1894 and 1897. Her book is a fascinating record of the Korean people, their customs, and way of life just after the Sino-Japanese War. Her account includes her observations about Queen Min and the Liancourt rocks, which continue to be an ongoing issue between Korea and Japan.
Korea Old and New: A History
By: Eckert, Carter et al
1990, Seoul: Ilchokak Publishers

This source has been one of the most widely consulted and acclaimed books about Korea and it was for years was a basic text in Korean Studies courses. The tumultuous developments of the 20th century receive the most coverage, but the book’s balanced treatment of traditional Korea emphasizes cultural events as integrally related to the political, social, and economic evolution of a very old and distinguished civilization. Five highly regarded scholars provide the reader with an understanding of each period, clarifying the past while providing an understanding of the truly remarkable changes that have taken place in Korea.
Korean Spirit and Culture Series
By: n.d. Admiral Yi Sun-sin
Seoul: Diamond Sutra Recitation Group

The book introduces the reader to the life and achievements of one of Korea’s great military heroes. The entire book may be found at the following website: http://www.kscpp.net.
Korea’s Place in the Sun: A Modern History
By: Cumings, Bruce
1997

The author, a leading American authority on modern Korea, provides the reader with an accessible, informative and exciting account of Korean history. Beginning with an overview of the nation’s cultural and political traditions, the author then focuses specifically on the country’s long 20th century–a period of colonial exploitation by Japan, war, national division, rapid economic growth and political turmoil. His concluding chapter discusses the significance of the Korean migration to the United States.
Los Angeles’s Koreatown
By: Katherine Yungmee Kim
Katherine Yungmee Kim, a young writer and free lance journalist for KoreAm, has written an engaging and well written historical account of Koreatown Los Angeles with photographs. The book includes images and information from the arrival of the first Koreans in 2003 through the Los Angeles Riots of 1991 and beyond. The final photograph and caption includes plans for Koreatown in the near future.
North Korea: 2005 and Beyond
By: Yun, Philip W. and Gi-Wook Shin. Editors
2006

The editors have included articles written by some of leading North Korean specialists in politics, economics, human rights, and security issues. The book presents a snapshot of what is happening in Korea now and the challenges of dealing with North Korea.
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea
By: Demick, Barbara
2009, Spiegel and Grau

The Beijing bureau chief of the Los Angeles Times takes her title from a song of national pride that teachers in North Korea have their children sing, which claims that they “have nothing to envy in the world. The New York Times Review of Books states that “her book is a powerful account of the life stories of defectors that suggests a human rights tragedy of huge proportions that is taking place out of the view of the Western public, while news headlines focus on North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.”
Sources of Korean Civilization, Volumes 1 and 2
By: Lee, Peter
1993

This anthology is the most ambitious, comprehensive, and authoritative English-language sourcebook of Korean civilization ever assembled. Encompassing social intellectual, religious, and literary traditions from ancient times through World War II, this collection reveals the body of thought, beliefs, and customs unique to the Korean people. Each section begins with a broad historical introduction to provide context and perspective, and contains representative writings from the era, with commentary, background, and analysis.
Tears of Blood: A Korean War POW’s Fight for Freedom, Family, and Justice
By Yoo, Young-Bok 2012
Tears of Blood is a highly readable and concise account of a survivor of the Korean War, harsh imprisonment, and forty-seven years of extreme hardship in North Korea until he escaped to freedom in South Korea at age seventy. Yoo’s moving account is beautifully translated by Paul Kim who was only a junior in high school when he translated the autobiography. Tears of Blood is highly recommended for high school and undergraduate students.  Paperback.
The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War
By: Halberstam, David
2007

The author, one of he most distinguished American journalists and historians, has written a “superb conjoining of all the facts of this tragic war: the military tactics and strategy of both sides, the international diplomacy; the internal politics; the personalities of the various players.” It is a great book and possibly the best one-volume history of the Korean War ever written in English.
The Koreans: Who They Are, What They Want, Where Their Future Lies
By: Breen, Michael
1998, New York: Saint Martin’s Press

An informative, personal account of Korea and the Korean people today.
The Koreas
By: Connor, Mary, ed
2009, ABC-CLIO Publishers

This source is one of the most complete, accessible, and up-to-date resources available on both North Korea and South Korea. The audience for this book is high school and undergraduate students and their instructors. The Koreas reveals how much life on the Korean peninsula has rapidly changed in recent years. With a team of scholars comparing life in authoritarian North Korea and democratic South Korea, the reference book presents an authoritative and unprecedented look at the contrast and similarities of the two nation’s histories, geographies, politics, cultures, and societies. Cultural contents include explorations of Korean literature, music, arts, language, cuisine, etiquette, and the “Korean Wave.” Available on Amazon.com
The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History
By: Oberdorfer, Don
1997

Don Oberdofer, former Northeast Asian and diplomatic correspondent of the WashingtonPost, writes what is regarded as one of the best and most gripping narratives of Korean history from the 1970s to the mid-1990s. He draws upon his personal contact with top Korean leaders over four decades, investigative reporting skills and thorough academic research to achieve a very exciting and balanced narrative of a tragically divided country. One of the most memorable accounts relates to how close the United States actually came to war with North Korea during the Clinton administration.
Women of Korea: A History from Ancient Times to 1945
By: Kim, Yung-Chung, ed.
1976, Seoul: Ehwa Womans University Press

This is one of the most thorough studies to date of the status, role, and activities of Korean women through the country’s long history.

Recommended Publications

Education About Asia
This website provides resources for K-12 teachers, includes excellent film reviews, and helps educators locate audio-visual resources for teaching and learning about China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.  There are many lessons and articles on the website.
E-mail:bookorder@aasianst.org
Phone: (213) 333-9597
Website:www.aasianst.org
 
Korea: Lessons for High School Courses
Created by the Korea Society and recipient of Buchanan Award in 2000. It includes exceptional lessons on any number of topics: national treasures, the miracle on the Han, the Japanese occupation, the Korean War, South Koreans in the War in Vietnam, and women. The Korean War lessons could be included in United States history classes. Available for $12.00 from the Korea Society.
Korea: Lessons for High School Courses
Created by the Korea Society and recipient of Buchanan Award in 2000. It includes exceptional lessons on any number of topics: national treasures, the miracle on the Han, the Japanese occupation, the Korean War, South Koreans in the War in Vietnam, and women. The Korean War lessons could be included in United States history classes. Available for $12.00 from the Korea Society.
Address:KoreAm Journal, 17813 South Main Street #112, Gardena, CA. 90248
Phone:(310) 769-4913
Korea: Lessons for High School Courses
Created by the Korea Society and recipient of Buchanan Award in 2000. It includes exceptional lessons on any number of topics: national treasures, the miracle on the Han, the Japanese occupation, the Korean War, South Koreans in the War in Vietnam, and women. The Korean War lessons could be included in United States history classes. Available for $12.00 from the Korea Society.
Address:KoreAm Journal, 17813 South Main Street #112, Gardena, CA. 90248
Phone:(310) 769-4913
Koreana: Korean Art and Culture
By: Korea Foundation
A fascinating quarterly journal published by the Korea Foundation. Beautiful photographs. Includes articles on Korea past and present. Provides on-line abstracts of articles and accompanying photographs at http://www.kf.or.kr/koreafocus. For subscriptions write The Korea Foundation, C.P.O. Box 2147, Seoul, Korea. Free copies may be obtained from the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles.
Website:http://www.koreana.or.kr/
Learning from Asian Art: Korea
An exceptional teaching resource. Educators who know little about Korea can be confident in adopting the lessons with minimal preparation time. Teachers of all levels will be able to adapt these materials for their specific needs. Beautiful photographs and slides inspire assignments and research in art, history and language arts classes. The kit contains a resource book, a sizable map of Korea, a helpful comparative time line, twenty photographs, ten image cards and sixteen slides that include images of clay roof tiles, Buddhist sculpture, ceramics, folk art, furniture and screens from the 7th century to the work of a contemporary Korean artist. The resource book provides accurate and clear historical information, group activities and research ideas related to every art object. Creative projects, such as making 3-D dragons, clay tiles, scroll paintings and treasure boxes, are included with every photograph. The book also includes “looking questions,” a helpful glossary, a bibliography and Internet sites that provide more images of Korean art located in Asian and American museums.
This outstanding resource is available from the Philadelphia Art Museum’s museum shop at http://www.philamuseum.org. for $39.95.
Silla Korea and the Silk Road: Golden Age, Golden Threads
2006
This lesson book is an outstanding newly published resource for high school world history, geography and Asian studies classes. Maps, timelines, and descriptions of the Silk Road rarely show Korea’s integral involvement in Silk Road trade or the transmission of Silk Road ideas and goods from Korea to Japan. The overall purpose of this carefully researched lesson book is to expand the view of the Silk Road and of international trade found in most world history textbook and classes. Silla shows an Eastern instead of a Western view of Silk Road trade and deals with a time period that produced one of the world’s “Golden Ages.” The lesson also provides material for a debate on whether or not Silla benefited from the international connections along the Silk Road. Students may come to understand that some of the issues of globalization that we face today were also present for past cultures as well. This is available for $20 from The Korea Society on this page.
U.S.-South Korean Relations
By: SPICE/Stanford
This curriculum unit introduces students to the four core pillars of the U.S.-South Korean alliance: democracy, economic prosperity, security, and socio-cultural interaction. Through their study of these pillars, students develop an understanding of the nature and history of this longstanding relationship. Softcover. $44.95. It includes a CD-ROM of images and PowerPoint presentation. Very suitable for U.S. history, Asian Studies, Economics, and Government classes
Uncovering North Korea
By: SPICE/Stanford
This is a complete unit of study for secondary and community college students. “North Korea remains one of the most misunderstood and misrepresented countries in the United States. “Uncovering North Korea” seeks to fill this gap and strives to bring more accurate information and objectivity to the study of North Korea. Softcover $69.95. Includes a CD-ROM; DVD “A State of Mind.” See SPICE.Stanford.edu/catalogue

Organizations

Organizations | Cultural
Korean Cultural Center Los Angeles 
KCCLA is operated by the Korean government’s Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism. Its mission is to broaden Korea-U.S. relations through cultural and educational activities. KCCLA sponsors and hosts an assortment of activities, including art exhibitions, state performances, film screenings, traditional music and dance events, Korean food festivals, lectures, and sporting events. It also supports the Korea Academy for Educators’ efforts to hold Saturday workshops and five-day seminars on Korean history and culture. A museum displays a permanent collection of historical and contemporary Korean artifacts. The library collection includes 25,000 volumes of books, CDs, videotapes, and DVDs. Books are available in English and Korean. The center also has a series of free classes and workshops that introduce guests to the music, dance, folk art, and language of the Korean people. Classes in the Korean language are also available. A student tour of the museum can be arranged. If you wish to be on the mailing list, please notify the Korean Cultural Center.
Phone: (323) 936-7141
Address: 5505 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA. 90036
Website: http://www.kccla.org
International Korean Educators Network (IKEN)
IKEN’s objectives are to establish a uniform policy for educating each generation of Korean descent in their ancestral language and culture. At the same time it will foster a desire to assimilate into the American culture sufficiently to become productive citizens and leaders. Its goal is also to create a network of teachers and students who will continue to celebrate their Korean heritage and take on leadership roles to advance the goals of both their cultures. IKEN supports the Korean Dual Language Program (KDLP) within the Los Angeles Unified School District by publishing digital textbooks and expanding KDLP to other states. The Korean digital textbooks are innovative audio-visual materials for teaching Korean language and are uploaded on the IKEN website. Korean Dual Language Programs deliver Korean and English instructions from kindergarten through 12th grade with high expectations of students in all academic areas. Its main objective is to promote complete bi-literacy. The program includes non-Korean heritage students who can expect to become bilingual as well as bicultural. Korean heritage students will develop not only their self-identity, but also learn to appreciate multiculturalism and globalization.
E-mail:info@ikeneducate.org
Website:www.ikeneducate.org
 K-12 Korean Language Teachers Association in USA

Korean Language Teachers Association in USA (KLTA-USA) realizes the importance of Korean language education and pursues the globalization of the Korean language.  will take an active role in supporting educators of Korean language and culture in different types of schools such as Korean Dual Language Program and Korean language classes as a foreign language in secondary schools in US to share a common pedagogy in positively influencing the future generation.KLTA-USA will set forth in the promotion of Korean teachers’ professionalism for the greater vision to globalize the Korean language by maintaining fellowship and unity of the Korean language teachers.  We will support in exchanging useful teaching materials and methodology applicable to the Korean language teachers.

First, KLTA teachers will provide second generation of Korean heritage students with vast opportunities to master Korean language, to appreciate Korean culture, and to strengthen self-identity as productive, global citizens of future.

Second, KLTA teachers will foster the competitive leadership among the young leaders of tomorrow who will build stronger bridges of linguistic and cultural understanding throughout the world by providing multi-cultural education.

In order to fulfill these goals, all KLTA members and I will effectively communicate with each member, actively collaborate with other organizations, and make a big commitment to help students.

 

 

InteInternational Foundation Korea University   

The International Foundation for Korea University, Inc. (IFKU) was established in October 1997. The IFKU is approved by the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as a non-profit foundation, which is incorporated in the state of New York.

The Objectives of our organization are to:

  1. Establish an international base, outside of Korea, to promote a closer relationship among Korea University Alumni no longer living in Korea, as well as any individual or institution that is interested in international cultural development and promotions with Korea.
  2. Increase support to Korea University to help further the globalization of education and cultural exchanges at the worldwide level. We will actively promote exchange programs at Korea University for students in the United States and other countries around the world. We will also promote and assist Korea University in establishing and improving exchange programs at universities in the United States and worldwide.
  3. Help facilitate and promote the exchange of educational and intellectual information between Korea University and universities in the United States.
  4. Organize both educational and cultural conferences and forums on various topics that are current issues faced by Korea University and/or Korea as a whole.
  5. Actively interact with government agencies and private institutions in the United States and around the world to accomplish the above objectives.
  6. Publish articles, books and periodic publications.
  7. Raise and manage the organization’s funds from individuals, charity organizations, educational institutions, science and other non-profit foundations and corporations for appropriate activities for the above objectives.

 

 

 

Foundation for Korean Language and Culture 

(Formerly the Foundation for SAT II Korean) The Foundation is a non-profit organization whose main objective is to promote Korean language and culture throughout the United States. It was founded in 1994 in response to the Korean American community’s desire to include Korean as a foreign language option on the Scholastic Aptitude Test II (SAT II). The Foundation organizes annual international conferences on Korean studies, offers scholarships to middle and high school students enrolled in Korean language classes, provides scholarship for teachers enrolled in Korean language single subject teaching credential programs, provides an intensive summer training program for Korean language teachers in middle and high schools, promotes the opening and expansion of Korean language classes in middle and high schools, and provides financial support for Korean language textbook projects and SAT II Korean practice tests. The Foundation supports a program that includes approximately thirty educators (high school administrators and district superintendents) from various parts of the United States to travel to Korea during the summer to learn about Korea, its people and language.
Phone: (213) 380-5718
Address: 680 Wilshire Place, Suite 416, Los Angeles, CA 90005
Korea Society
The Korea Society is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated solely to the promotion of greater awareness, understanding and cooperation between the people of the United States and Korea. In pursuit of its mission, the society arranges programs that facilitate discussion, exchanges and research on topics of vital interest to both countries in the areas of public policy, business, education, intercultural relations and the arts.
E-mail: korea.ny@koreasociety.org
Phone: (212) 759-7525
Fax: (212) 759-7530
Address: 950 Third Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10022
Website: www.koreasociety.org
Korean Adoptee, Adoptive Family Network
This network provides articles, website information, announcements, and event information. Its mission is to support networking and to build understanding among adoptees, adoptive families, Koreans, and Korean Americans. It includes extensive list of Korean camps for children.
E-mail: kaanet@aol.com
Website: www.kaanet.com
Korean Consulate General
The Consulate has free materials for teachers: books, periodicals, and videos
E-mail: lac@anet.net
Address: 3243 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA. 90010, (213) 385-9300
Korean Cultural Service of New York
The service provides information on Korea and Korea-U.S. relations and guidance to students who wish to participate in exchange programs. The service has an extensive library of more than 10,000 books, periodicals, CD-ROMs and videotapes.
Phone: (212) 759-9550
Fax: (212) 688-8640
Address: 460 Park Avenue, 6th floor, New York, NY 10022
Website: www.koreanculture.org
Korean Cultural Service of Washington, D.C.
The service offers a variety of media resources (but it’s in German!)
Email: korinfo@koreaemb.org
Phone: (202) 797-6343
Fax: (202) 387-0413
Address: 2370 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20008
Website: www.koreaemb.org
The Korea Society in cooperation with the Korea Foundation
Fellowships available for school administrators, teachers, textbook writers, and professors or instructors in schools of education. The Korea Society also nominates five American delegates for the UNESCO youth camp each summer and pays camp participation fees. The Society also supports Project Bridge, a year long program of intercultural youth leadership activities for Los Angeles and New York high school students. The program includes a two-week education study tour of Korea every April. For information, go to http://www.koreasociety.org/korean_studies/fellowships/
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